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Isolation and identification of antitrypanosomal and antimycobacterial active steroids from the sponge haliclona simulans

Viegelmann, Christina and Parker, Jennifer and Ooi, Thengtheng and Clements, Carol and Abbott, Gráinne and Young, Louise and Kennedy, Jonathan and Dobson, Alan D W and Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie (2014) Isolation and identification of antitrypanosomal and antimycobacterial active steroids from the sponge haliclona simulans. Marine Drugs, 12 (5). pp. 2937-2952. ISSN 1660-3397

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Abstract

The marine sponge Haliclona simulans collected from the Irish Sea yielded two new steroids: 24-vinyl-cholest-9-ene-3β,24-diol and 20-methyl-pregn-6-en-3β-ol,5a,8a-epidioxy, along with the widely distributed 24-methylenecholesterol. One of the steroids possesses an unusually short hydrocarbon side chain. The structures were elucidated using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and confirmed using electron impact- and high resolution electrospray-mass spectrometry. All three steroids possess antitrypanosomal and anti-mycobacterial activity. All the steroids were found to possess low cytotoxicity against Hs27 which was above their detected antitrypanosomal potent concentrations.