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Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS) , based within the Faculty of Science.

SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

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Scientifically unfounded precaution drives European Commission's recommendations on EDC regulation, while defying common sense, well-established science and risk assessment principles

Dietrich, Daniel R and von Aulock, Sonja and Marquardt, Hans and Blaauboer, Bas and Dekant, Wolfgang and Kehrer, James and Hengstler, Jan and Collier, Abby and Batta Gori, Gio and Pelkonen, Olavi and Lang, Florian and Nijkamp, Frans P and Stemmer, Kerstin and Li, Albert and Savolainen, Kai and Wallace Hayes, A and Gooderham, Nigel and Harvey, Alan (2013) Scientifically unfounded precaution drives European Commission's recommendations on EDC regulation, while defying common sense, well-established science and risk assessment principles. ALTEX : Alternatives to Animal Experimentation, 30 (3). pp. 381-382. ISSN 1868-596X

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Abstract

We, the undersigned editors of journals of pharmacology and toxicology, are drawing your attention to the imminent decisions by the European Commission to enforce a regulatory framework for so-called endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs).1 The currently drafted framework is based on virtually complete ignorance of all well-established and taught principles of pharmacology and toxicology, of opinions raised by the European Commission’s own competent expert authority (European Food Safety Authority (EFSA 2013), and of critical statements made by member countries, while avoiding asking for support from the European Commission’s own scientific expert committees.