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Can physical activity for health be promoted in those who have limb absence?

Deans, Sarah and Rowe, David; Kirk, Alison and McGarry, Anthony, eds. (2014) Can physical activity for health be promoted in those who have limb absence? In: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Postgraduate Research Day, 2014-04-30 - 2014-04-30, University of Strathclyde.

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    Abstract

    Physical activity participation can make people feel good and has a number of health benefits. It can reduce the risk of major illnesses, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancer by up to 50%, and lower the risk of early death by up to 30%. However, according to the Health Survey for England (self-reported data), only 39% of men and 29% of women met the government’s physical activity recommendations in 2008. Compliance has not improved to date. Healthcare professionals caring for people with limb absence understand the mobility challenges which can face their patients during prosthetic rehabilitation and beyond, so how relevant and realistic is physical activity promotion for this population? This poster presentation presents current physical activity recommendations for the general population. Sarah describes a University of Strathclyde online survey created for UK health professionals who care for people with limb absence. The aim of the survey is to help researchers understand professionals’ knowledge of physical activity guidelines; describe professionals’ involvement in physical activity promotion; and investigate professionals’ desired practice in promoting physical activity to their patients.