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Sudanese young people of refugee background in rural and regional Australia : social capital and education success.

Major, Jae and Wilkinson, Jane and Langat, Kiprono and Santoro, Ninetta (2013) Sudanese young people of refugee background in rural and regional Australia : social capital and education success. Australian and International Journal of Rural Education, 23 (3). pp. 95-104.

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Abstract

This article discusses literature pertaining to the settlement of African refugees in regional and rural Australia, particularly focusing on the specific challenges and opportunities faced by Sudanese young people of refugee background in education. Drawing on a pilot study of the out-of-school resources of regionally located young Sudanese students, we discuss the role of social and other capitals in generating conditions that may facilitate educational success for these students. We argue the case for educational research that takes into account the resources and capital upon which Sudanese young people of refugee background and their families draw in order to achieve in education.