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Cross-curricular or cross-purposes? An exploration of the relationship between Citizenship Education and Physical Education

Adams, Paul and Griggs, G (2005) Cross-curricular or cross-purposes? An exploration of the relationship between Citizenship Education and Physical Education. The Bulletin of Physical Education, 41 (1). pp. 23-42. ISSN 0007-5043

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Abstract

Since 2002 Citizenship Education has been a statutory subject on the Key Stage 3 and 4 curriculum. In addition, at Key Stages 1 and 2 it has been incorporated into a non- statutory framework for Personal, Social and Health Education and Citizenship. Much of that written to date has centred on the ways in which Citizenship Education can be planned for and operationalised within a cross-curricular approach. Although the contribution from Physical Education (PE) has been less than that for History, for example, it has received some attention. This paper contends that, to date, such deliberations have either conflated Citizenship Education and Personal - Social education, or have failed to acknowledge the differences that exist between PE as a National Curriculum subject and PE as part of the wider school debate. Thus, any proposals that see PE as a contributor to Citizenship Education have at best been misplaced.