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Measurement and prediction of the resistance of a laser sailing dinghy

Day, A and Nixon, E (2014) Measurement and prediction of the resistance of a laser sailing dinghy. Transactions of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects. Part B, International Journal of Small Craft Technology, 156 (B1). pp. 11-20. ISSN 1740-0694

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Abstract

This study explores the insight that can be gained into the performance of a conventional sailing dinghy from a program of tanks testing in a range of displacement and trim conditions, and further investigates the extent to which performance can be predicted using a regression approach developed for sailing yachts, with the ultimate aim of developing performance prediction tools customised for sailing dinghies. The upright resistance of a Laser Dinghy is examined through tank-testing at three different displacements and with a range of trims. Results show that residuary resistance is substantially affected by displacement, and that trim can have a beneficial effect at the lower and upper extremes of the speed range. Comparison with tank test results show that the Delft regression approach does not predict the resistance of a Laser particularly accurately, substantially underestimates the weight sensitivity of a Laser, and cannot reliably predict the impact of trim.