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Adding pedagogical process knowledge to pedagogical content knowledge : teachers' professional learning and theories of practice in science education

Smith, Colin and Blake, Allan and Kelly, Fearghal and Gray, Peter and McKie, Michelle (2013) Adding pedagogical process knowledge to pedagogical content knowledge : teachers' professional learning and theories of practice in science education. Educational Research eJournal, 2 (2). 132 - 159.

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Abstract

A concept of pedagogical process knowledge (PPK) is introduced to partner pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). This concept arises from observing the learning of teachers engaged in a course supporting them in introducing more inquiry-based methods into their practice. This course aimed to empower teachers through professional learning. PCK alone did not seem adequately to explain the teachers’ learning, which involved them developing new pedagogical processes to support the development of inquiry-based learning processes in their students – hence PPK. Together, PCK and PPK are important constituents of teachers’ theories of practice, although PPK may be often less developed.