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Accuracy of a freehand sculpting tool for unicondylar knee replacement

Smith, Julie R. and Riches, Philip E. and Rowe, Philip J. (2014) Accuracy of a freehand sculpting tool for unicondylar knee replacement. International Journal of Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery, 10 (2). pp. 162-169.

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Abstract

Unicondylar knee replacement is technically challenging and malalignment of the implant results in high failure rates. Surgical robotics with navigation is a potential solution. The accuracy of performing unicondylar knee replacement using a freehand sculpting, semi active robotic tool was investigated using twenty synthetic femur and tibia. The resultant cut surface was compared to the intra operative planned surface. Resultant femoral and tibial implant placement was compared to the planned implant position. The maximum overcut or undercut was 2.5mm. The mean femoral and tibial surfaces showed a slight undercut (0.14mm and 0.20mm). The maximum rotational error was 3.2o and RMS angular error was 1.46o across all orientations. The maximum translational error was 1.18mm and the RMS translational error across all directions was 0.61mm. The tool produced accurate implant placement with small errors comparable to those reported by other robotic assistive devices on the market.