Picture offshore wind farm

Open Access research that is improving renewable energy technology...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers across the departments of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering (MAE), Electronic & Electrical Engineering (EEE), and Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering (NAOME), all of which are leading research into aspects of wind energy, the control of wind turbines and wind farms.

Researchers at EEE are examining the dynamic analysis of turbines, their modelling and simulation, control system design and their optimisation, along with resource assessment and condition monitoring issues. The Energy Systems Research Unit (ESRU) within MAE is producing research to achieve significant levels of energy efficiency using new and renewable energy systems. Meanwhile, researchers at NAOME are supporting the development of offshore wind, wave and tidal-current energy to assist in the provision of diverse energy sources and economic growth in the renewable energy sector.

Explore Open Access research by EEE, MAE and NAOME on renewable energy technologies. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Teaching and learning of performance measurement in OR/MS degrees

Wisniewski, M. and Shafti, F. (2003) Teaching and learning of performance measurement in OR/MS degrees. MSOR Connections, 3 (4). pp. 39-41. ISSN 1473-4869

[img]
Preview
Text (strathprints004411)
strathprints004411.pdf

Download (280kB) | Preview

Abstract

A review of existing UK MS/OR undergraduate programmes was completed to assess the extent and nature of performance measurement teaching. In addition, a survey of performance measurement practitioners was undertaken to obtain views on what should be taught in relation to performance measurement. A survey of 23 undergraduate MS/OR degrees in the UK revealed that all the academic respondents supported the inclusion of PM teaching. However, only four distinct PM classes could be found amongst these degrees. The PM techniques taught were broadly similar although the wider context of PM was taught in only 2 of the classes. A survey of a small number of PM practitioners revealed that the Balanced Scorecard and Benchmarking were the two most commonly applied PM techniques with the majority of respondents learning about PM from personal experience and reading rather than through formal education. It appears that there is an opportunity for MS/OR teaching to make a major contribution to the development of PM as a discipline. However, academic respondents whose MS/OR degree course did not teach PM indicated that lack of staff expertise in PM combined with an already full syllabus were the main barriers to introducing a PM class.