Picture map of Europe with pins indicating European capital cities

Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

Explore research outputs by the European Policies Research Centre...

Accountability for the sentencing decision process : Towards a new understanding

Tata, Cyrus (2002) Accountability for the sentencing decision process : Towards a new understanding. In: Sentencing and Society. Ashgate, Aldershot, UK, pp. 399-420. ISBN 0754621839

[img]
Preview
PDF
AccountabilityChapt_1_.pdf - Final Published Version

Download (8MB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF
AccountabilityChapt.pdf - Preprint

Download (8MB) | Preview

Abstract

Combining the latest work of leading sentencing and punishment scholars from ten different countries, this international volume answers key questions in the study of sentencing and society. It presents not only a rigorous examination of the latest legal and empirical research from around the world, but also reveals the workings of sentencing within society and as a social practice. Traditionally, work in the field of sentencing has been dominated by legal and philosophical approaches. Distinctively, this volume provides a more sociological approach to sentencing: so allowing previously unanswered questions to be addressed and new questions to be opened. This extensive collection is drawn from around one third of the papers presented at the First International Conference on Sentencing and Society. Almost without exception, the chapters have been revised, cross-referenced and updated. The overall themes and findings of the international volume are set out by the opening 'Introduction' and the closing 'Reflections' chapters. Research findings on particular penal policy questions are balanced with an analysis of fundamental conceptual issues, making this international volume suitable reading for: sentencing and punishment scholars, criminal justice policy-makers, and graduate students.