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Literary linguistics: Open Access research in English language

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by English Studies at Strathclyde. Particular research specialisms include literary linguistics, the study of literary texts using techniques drawn from linguistics and cognitive science.

The team also demonstrates research expertise in Renaissance studies, researching Renaissance literature, the history of ideas and language and cultural history. English hosts the Centre for Literature, Culture & Place which explores literature and its relationships with geography, space, landscape, travel, architecture, and the environment.

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Impact of customer-based corporate reputation on non-monetary and monetary outcomes : the roles of commitment and service context risk

Walsh, Gianfranco and Bartikowski, B. and Beatty, S. E. (2013) Impact of customer-based corporate reputation on non-monetary and monetary outcomes : the roles of commitment and service context risk. British Journal of Management, n/a (n/a). n/a. ISSN 1045-3172

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Abstract

A firm's reputation is an important intangible asset, because of its potential for value creation. The authors explore non-monetary and monetary outcomes of customer-based corporate reputation (CBR) and hypothesize that commitment serves as a partial mediator, while service context risk is a moderator, of these relationships. Using a large sample of service customers who evaluated the reputation of service firms in four service categories, the results show that (1) commitment partially mediates the relationship between CBR and most of the outcome variables, and (2) service provider selection risk moderates these relationships, such that reputation has a stronger effect on several non-monetary outcomes for higher-risk services and commitment has a stronger effect for lower-risk services, consistent with a dual-processing framework explanation. The authors discuss the theoretical and managerial implications.