Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Effects on coping skills and anxiety of a universal school-based mental health intervention delivered in Scottish primary schools

Collins, Sabrina and Woolfson, Lisa Marks and Durkin, Kevin (2014) Effects on coping skills and anxiety of a universal school-based mental health intervention delivered in Scottish primary schools. School Psychology International, 35 (1). pp. 85-100. ISSN 0143-0343

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Anxiety disorders are common in children and may signal risk of depression, social or academic difficulties. This study evaluated the effects of a universal mental health promotion intervention delivered in primary schools. Three hundred and seventeen 9 to10 year olds were randomly allocated by class group to intervention condition (psychologist-led or teacher-led), or comparison condition. Coping and anxiety were measured pre- and post-intervention and at six month follow-up. Significant anxiety reduction and improved coping were found post-intervention and at follow-up. There were no significant differences between the teacher- and psychologist-led intervention groups. Results indicated that a universal school programme delivered by teachers can have positive effects on anxiety and coping.