Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

An approach for the geophysical assessment of fissuring of estuary and river flood embankments : validation against two case studies in England and Scotland

Sentenac, Phillippe and Jones, Gareth and Zielinski, Marcin and Tarantino, Alessandro (2012) An approach for the geophysical assessment of fissuring of estuary and river flood embankments : validation against two case studies in England and Scotland. Environmental Earth Sciences, 69 (6). pp. 1939-1949. ISSN 1866-6280

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

This paper proposes a two-stage geophysical approach to map the vertical cracking and the structural integrity of flood embankments made up of clay geomaterials susceptible to fissuring. The first stage is based on a ‘coarse-resolution’ investigation using conventional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) equipment to identify the fissured zones in the embankment. This step is complemented by an additional geophysical technique, electromagnetic, to verify the ERT measurements. The second stage is based on a ‘high-resolution’ investigation using a miniature ERT system previously developed at the laboratory scale for detailed mapping of the fissure patterns. The ‘coarse-resolution’ stage is the major focus of this paper and was validated against two case studies in England and Scotland. Longitudinal ERT survey provided a tomographic picture of the upper desiccated zones of the embankments and fissured areas in 2-D, validating the range of resistivity results obtained previously on a fissured clay model in the laboratory. A transversal embankment resistivity tomography was also completed to show the positions of fissured zones in detail in the field. The electromagnetic technique as a fast screening tool allowed cross checking the ERT results and was also efficient in detecting high and low conductivity zones, indicating areas of potential weakness during flash floods and heavy rain. The southern embankment in England showed more fluctuations in the conductivity and resistivity than the north embankment in Scotland, likely to be due to the differences in climate, vegetation and location characteristics between the two sites. Conclusions were also drawn on the potential weaknesses for both embankments and the effect of vegetation on conductivity measurements.