Picture water droplets

Developing mathematical theories of the physical world: Open Access research on fluid dynamics from Strathclyde

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by Strathclyde's Department of Mathematics & Statistics, where continuum mechanics and industrial mathematics is a specialism. Such research seeks to understand fluid dynamics, among many other related areas such as liquid crystals and droplet evaporation.

The Department of Mathematics & Statistics also demonstrates expertise in population modelling & epidemiology, stochastic analysis, applied analysis and scientific computing. Access world leading mathematical and statistical Open Access research!

Explore all Strathclyde Open Access research...

Numerical simulation of a Gyro-BWO with a helically corrugated interaction region, cusp electron gun and depressed collector

He, Wenlong and Donaldson, Craig and Zhang, Liang and Ronald, Kevin and Phelps, Alan and Cross, Adrian (2011) Numerical simulation of a Gyro-BWO with a helically corrugated interaction region, cusp electron gun and depressed collector. In: Numerical Simulations of Physical and Engineering Processes. InTech, pp. 101-132. ISBN 978-953-307-620-1

[img]
Preview
Text (He-etal-Intech-2011-Numerical-simulation-of-a-Gyro-BWO-with-a-helically-corrugated-interaction-region-cusp-electron-gun)
He_etal_Intech_2011_Numerical_simulation_of_a_Gyro_BWO_with_a_helically_corrugated_interaction_region_cusp_electron_gun.pdf
Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 logo

Download (898kB) | Preview

Abstract

The gyrotron backward wave oscillator (gyro-BWO) is an efficient source of frequency-tunable high-power coherent radiation in the microwave to the terahertz range. It has attracted significant research interest recently due to its potential applications in many areas such as remote sensing, medical imaging, plasma heating and spectroscopy. A gyro-BWO using a helically corrugated interaction region (HCIR) has achieved an even wider frequency tuning range and higher efficiency compared with a conventional gyro-BWO with a smooth-bore cavity. This is due to the existence of an “ideal”eigenwave in the HCIR with a large and constant group velocity when the axial wave number is small.