Picture of UK Houses of Parliament

Leading national thinking on politics, government & public policy through Open Access research

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Government & Public Policy, based within the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Research here is 1st in Scotland for research intensity and spans a wide range of domains. The Department of Politics demonstrates expertise in understanding parties, elections and public opinion, with additional emphases on political economy, institutions and international relations. This international angle is reflected in the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC) which conducts comparative research on public policy. Meanwhile, the Centre for Energy Policy provides independent expertise on energy, working across multidisciplinary groups to shape policy for a low carbon economy.

Explore the Open Access research of the School of Government & Public Policy. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Partially adaptive broadband beamforming with a subband selective tranformation matrix

Liu, Wei and Weiss, S. and Hanzo, L. (2002) Partially adaptive broadband beamforming with a subband selective tranformation matrix. In: IEEE Sensor Array and Multichannel Signal Processing Workshop, 2002-08-04 - 2002-08-06.

[img]
Preview
PDF
liu02b.pdf
Final Published Version

Download (488kB)| Preview

    Abstract

    A partially adaptive generalized sidelobe canceller (GSC) with a novel spatially/spectrally subband-selective transformation matrix is proposed. The row vectors of this matrix constitute a series of bandpass filters, which separate the blocking matrix outputs into components of different DOAs and frequencies. This results in bandlimited spectra of its outputs, which is further exploited by subband decomposition and discarding the low-pass subbands appropriately prior to running independent unconstrained adaptive filters in subbands. By these steps the computational complexity of the system is greatly reduced. Additionally, a faster convergence speed is achieved by joint spatial and spectral decorrelation.