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Performance of periodic piezoelectric composite arrays incorporating a passive phase exhibiting anisotropic properties

O'Leary, R.L. and Parr, A.C.S. and Troge, A. and Pethrick, R.A. and Hayward, G. (2006) Performance of periodic piezoelectric composite arrays incorporating a passive phase exhibiting anisotropic properties. In: 2005 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symosium, 2005-09-18 - 2005-09-21.

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Abstract

This paper explores the minimisation of interelement cross talk in 1-D and 2-D periodic composite array structures through the incorporation of a passive phase exhibiting anisotropic elastic properties. Initially the PZFlex finite element code was used to monitor array aperture response as a function of material properties. It is shown that in array structures comprising passive polymer materials possessing low longitudinal loss and high shear loss, inter-element mechanical cross talk is reduced, without a concomitant reduction in element sensitivity. A number of polymer materials with the desired properties were synthesised and their elastic character confirmed through a program of materials characterisation. Finally, a range of experimental devices exhibiting improved directional response, as a result of a significant reduction in interelement cross talk, are presented and the predicted array characteristics are shown to compare favourably in each case.