Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Development of a low-cost video vector for the display of ground reaction forces during gait

Rowe, Philip (1996) Development of a low-cost video vector for the display of ground reaction forces during gait. Medical Physics, 18 (7). pp. 591-595. ISSN 0094-2405

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Video vector systems offer a simple and valuable tool suitable for evaluating and analysing the biomechanics of human motion. These systems are capable of widespread applications in education, clinical evaluation and research. However, the literature indicated that current video vector systems are expensive and not widely available. The work presented in this study indicates an alternative method of constructing a video vector system which is inexpensive and relatively simple to build. The system uses a VGA to video adaptor to convert computer-generated graphics of the ground reaction force into a video formet. This picture can then be overlaid on to a video picture of the moving subject using a video mixer. By careful positioning of the camera and suitable perspective drawing of the computer image a true representation of the relationship between the force vector and the subject can be produced. The system has been found to be reliable, versatile and robust and has been used for a variety of motion analysis tasks. It is hoped that the work contained in this paper will encourage others to construct their own video vector systems using similar commercially available components and hence benefit from the considerable advantages that such a system can offer. This paper describes the design and construction of a simple, inexpensive video vector system which has been shown to be a useful biomechanical technique with widespread applications in the educational, clinical and research environments.