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Where technology & law meet: Open Access research on data security & its regulation ...

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs exploring both the technical aspects of computer security, but also the regulation of existing or emerging technologies. A research specialism of the Department of Computer & Information Sciences (CIS) is computer security. Researchers explore issues surrounding web intrusion detection techniques, malware characteristics, textual steganography and trusted systems. Digital forensics and cyber crime are also a focus.

Meanwhile, the School of Law and its Centre for Internet Law & Policy undertake studies on Internet governance. An important component of this work is consideration of privacy and data protection questions and the increasing focus on cybercrime and 'cyberterrorism'.

Explore the Open Access research by CIS on computer security or the School of Law's work on law, technology and regulation. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Capacity bounds and code designs for cooperative diversity

Uppal, M. and Liu, Zhixin and Stankovic, V. and Host-madsen, Anders and Xiong, Zixiang (2006) Capacity bounds and code designs for cooperative diversity. In: UNSPECIFIED.

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Abstract

Cooperative diversity is a novel technique for conveying information in wireless networks, where closely located single-antenna network nodes cooperatively transmit and/or receive by forming virtual antenna arrays. For the simplest cooperative setup with two transmitters and two receivers, we first present the latest advances made in determining the theoretical capacity bounds and point out the important roles of coding with side information in achieving the lower bounds on the capacity region. We then focus on practical code designs and describe two coding schemes: one for receiver cooperation based on Wyner-Ziv coding; another for transmitter cooperation based on dirty-paper coding. The two designs perform close to the theoretical bounds and show the gains of cooperative communications predicted by theory.