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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Sensitivity analysis and experimental design of a stiff signal transduction pathway model

Yue, H. and Jia, J.F. and Brown, M. and Wang, H. and Kell, D.B. (2007) Sensitivity analysis and experimental design of a stiff signal transduction pathway model. In: 5th International Conference on Sensitivity Analysis of Model Output (SAMO2007), 2007-06-18.

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Abstract

Sensitivity analysis is normally used to analyze how sensitive a system is with respect to the change of parameters or initial conditions and is perhaps best known in systems biology via the formalism of metabolic control analysis [1, 2]. The nuclear factor B (NF-B) signalling pathway is an important cellular signalling pathway, of which protein phosphorylation is a major factor controlling the activation of further downstream events. The NF-κB proteins regulate numerous genes that play important roles in inter- and intra-cellular signalling, cellular stress responses, cell growth, survival, and apoptosis. As such, its specificity and its role in the temporal control of gene expression are of crucial physiological interest.