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Driving innovations in manufacturing: Open Access research from DMEM

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by Strathclyde's Department of Design, Manufacture & Engineering Management (DMEM).

Centred on the vision of 'Delivering Total Engineering', DMEM is a centre for excellence in the processes, systems and technologies needed to support and enable engineering from concept to remanufacture. From user-centred design to sustainable design, from manufacturing operations to remanufacturing, from advanced materials research to systems engineering.

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Multisorbent plasma perfusion in fulminant hepatic failure: effects of duration and frequency of treatment in rats with grade III hepatic coma

Ryan, C.J. and Anilkumar, T. and Ben-Hamida, A.J.A. and Khorsandi, S.E. and Pusey, C.D. and Gaylor, J.D.S. and Courtney, J.M. and Aslam, M. (2001) Multisorbent plasma perfusion in fulminant hepatic failure: effects of duration and frequency of treatment in rats with grade III hepatic coma. Artificial Organs, 25 (2). pp. 109-118. ISSN 0160-564X

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Abstract

Using the model of galactosamine-induced fulminant hepatic failure in the rat, the effects of multisorbent plasma perfusion over Asahi uncoated spherical charcoal, Plasorba (BR-350) resin, and an endotoxin removing adsorbent (polymyxin B-sepharose) were determined in Grade III hepatic coma animals by studying survival as influenced by timing, duration, and frequency of treatment. The effects of treatment on liver cell proliferation and endotoxin removal also were examined. The results demonstrate that duration and frequency of treatment are major contributing factors in the successful application of nonbiological membrane-based multisorbent liver support systems. Examination of the regenerative activity in the liver indicates an enhanced proliferative response following multisorbent plasma perfusion compared with untreated fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) paired controls. Utilizing an endotoxin removal adsorbent alone, a marked reduction in systemic levels of endotoxin in FHF was demonstrated compared with nonperfused FHF paired controls. Despite current emphasis on bioartificial liver support systems, plasma purification by multisorbent systems offers a simple method for the removal of circulating toxic metabolites in general together with specific toxin removal.