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Investigating the influence of the constituent materials on the performance of periodic piezoelectric composite arrays

Gachagan, A. and Harvey, G. and O'Leary, R.L. and Mackersie, J.W. (2007) Investigating the influence of the constituent materials on the performance of periodic piezoelectric composite arrays. In: UNSPECIFIED.

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Abstract

This paper describes a theoretical investigation into the influence of the constituent materials on periodic composite array transducer performance. A finite element (FE) model, configured in PZFlex, is used to analyze the performance of a wedge coupled array transducer operating into a steel component. Here, the improvements offered by new single crystal piezoelectric materials are compared to standard PZT‐based configurations. In addition, new passive polymer materials, possessing low longitudinal loss and high shear loss, are evaluated for their potential to significantly reduce inter‐element mechanical cross talk. The FE results illustrate the potential for the next generation of array transducers incorporating these new materials and this is highlighted in the A‐scan predictions from simulated defects.