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The social patterning of fat and lean mass in a contemporary cohort of children

Reilly, John J and Ness, AR and Leary, S. and Wells, J. and Tobias, J. and Clark, E. and Smith, G.D. (2003) The social patterning of fat and lean mass in a contemporary cohort of children. International Journal of Pediatric Obesity (1). pp. 59-61. ISSN 1747-7166

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Abstract

Studies of the social patterning of obesity in children using body mass index have reported inconsistent results. We explored the association of social class with fat mass and lean mass in a contemporary cohort of children measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. We observed a clear social gradient of fat mass (with children of higher social class having a lower fat mass), but no gradient in lean mass or trunk fat mass. Our data show that inequalities in adiposity are present in primary school children and suggest that social inequalities in childhood obesity may have been underestimated in previous studies.