Picture of automobile manufacturing plant

Driving innovations in manufacturing: Open Access research from DMEM

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by Strathclyde's Department of Design, Manufacture & Engineering Management (DMEM).

Centred on the vision of 'Delivering Total Engineering', DMEM is a centre for excellence in the processes, systems and technologies needed to support and enable engineering from concept to remanufacture. From user-centred design to sustainable design, from manufacturing operations to remanufacturing, from advanced materials research to systems engineering.

Explore Open Access research by DMEM...

An automatic sequential recognition method for cortical auditory evoked potentials

Hoppe, U. and Weiss, S. and Stewart, R.W. and Eysholdt, U. (2001) An automatic sequential recognition method for cortical auditory evoked potentials. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 48 (2). pp. 154-164. ISSN 0018-9294

[img]
Preview
PDF
hoppe01a.pdf - Final Published Version

Download (298kB) | Preview

Abstract

The detection of cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP), which are part of the electroencephalogram (EEG) in reaction to acoustic stimuli, has important applications such as determining objective audiograms. The detection is usually performed by a human operator, with support from often basic signal processing methods. This paper presents a novel mechanism for the detection of CAEPs, which is fully automatic and stops the measurement when a given confidence is reached. This proposed detector comprises of three stages. First, a feature extraction by a wavelet transform parameterizes the time domain EEG signal by only few transform coefficients. This feature vector is then classified by a neural network which yields a binary vote on every EEG segment. Finally, a sequential statistical test is performed on successive classifications; this stops the measurement if a specified decision confidence has been reached. The adjustment of the detector according to a clinical database is discussed. Thus adjusted, the proposed CAEP detection scheme is applied to a study, and compared with a human operator. The results demonstrate that this method can attain similar results, but outperforms the human expert for stimulation levels close to the hearing threshold.