Picture of sea vessel plough through rough maritime conditions

Innovations in marine technology, pioneered through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering based within the Faculty of Engineering.

Research here explores the potential of marine renewables, such as offshore wind, current and wave energy devices to promote the delivery of diverse energy sources. Expertise in offshore hydrodynamics in offshore structures also informs innovations within the oil and gas industries. But as a world-leading centre of marine technology, the Department is recognised as the leading authority in all areas related to maritime safety, such as resilience engineering, collision avoidance and risk-based ship design. Techniques to support sustainability vessel life cycle management is a key research focus.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Virtual carrots, sticks and student engagement : supporting student researchers

Cassidy, Claire and Rimpiläinen, Sanna (2011) Virtual carrots, sticks and student engagement : supporting student researchers. Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 20 (2). pp. 209-225. ISSN 1475-939X

[img] Microsoft Word
virtualcarrotssticksfinalcopy.doc
Preprint

Download (115kB)

Abstract

This article describes a three-year research project which aimed to introduce a technological innovation in working with three cohorts of undergraduate students to support them in completing their final-year dissertations through the use of a Virtual Research Environment (VRE). An additional aim of the project was to establish, amongst the students, a Community of Enquiry. Drawing on evidence from module evaluations, focus group interviews and user logs, the article highlights how students engaged with the VRE to support their research projects and their peers. By examining the activities of the three cohorts the authors were able to apply the seven key factors for building an educational Community of Enquiry outlined in previous research by the first author and colleagues to assert that the third cohort worked collaboratively to the degree that they could be said to have formed a Community of Enquiry.