Picture water droplets

Developing mathematical theories of the physical world: Open Access research on fluid dynamics from Strathclyde

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by Strathclyde's Department of Mathematics & Statistics, where continuum mechanics and industrial mathematics is a specialism. Such research seeks to understand fluid dynamics, among many other related areas such as liquid crystals and droplet evaporation.

The Department of Mathematics & Statistics also demonstrates expertise in population modelling & epidemiology, stochastic analysis, applied analysis and scientific computing. Access world leading mathematical and statistical Open Access research!

Explore all Strathclyde Open Access research...

Alternation graphs

Halldorsson, Magnus and Kitaev, Sergey and Pyatkin, Artem (2011) Alternation graphs. In: Graph-theoretic concepts in computer science. Lecture Notes in Computer Science . Springer-Verlag Berlin, Berlin, pp. 191-202. ISBN 9783642258695

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

A graph G = (V,E) is an alternation graph if there exists a word W over the alphabet V such that letters x and y alternate in W if and only if (x,y) ∈ E for each x ≠ y. In this paper we give an effective characterization of alternation graphs in terms of orientations. Namely, we show that a graph is an alternation graph if and only if it admits a semi-transitive orientation defined in the paper. This allows us to prove a number of results about alternation graphs, in particular showing that the recognition problem is in NP, and that alternation graphs include all 3-colorable graphs. We also explore bounds on the size of the word representation of the graph. A graph G is a k-alternation graph if it is represented by a word in which each letter occurs exactly k times; the alternation number of G is the minimum k for which G is a k-alternation graph. We show that the alternation number is always at most n, while there exist graphs for which it is n/2.