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Learning from participants' responses in educational drama in the teaching of education for sustainable development

McNaughton, Marie Jeanne (2006) Learning from participants' responses in educational drama in the teaching of education for sustainable development. Research in Drama Education: The Journal of Applied Theatre and Performance, 11 (1). pp. 19-41. ISSN 1356-9783

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Abstract

The context for this paper is an on-going research project that sets out to examine the use of educational drama in the teaching of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in the upper stages of primary school. The drama lessons link with some of the key aims in ESD, with a particular locus in the Scottish education system. As 200515 has been designated by UNESCO as 'The Decade of Education for Sustainable Development', it is particularly important to examine and emphasise the key role of drama in the learning process. The main focus of the paper is the examination of what pupils' evaluations of the drama work reveal about how drama might be particularly appropriate for use in ESD-related work. The relationships between the participants in the drama, teacher and pupils, both in and out of role are explored. The conclusions suggest that active, participative learning and the unique way of working within the dramatic context might allow children to develop skills and attitudes necessary for active citizenship and might facilitate learning in ESD.