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Students' attributions of sources of influence on self-perception in solo performance in music

Hewitt, Allan (2004) Students' attributions of sources of influence on self-perception in solo performance in music. Research Studies in Music Education, 22 (2004). pp. 42-58. ISSN 1321-103X

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore university students' attributions of sources of influence on their Perceived Control beliefs in relation to solo performance in music. Drawing on data collected in semi-structured interviews, the paper outlines three principal sources of influence; assessment, previous performance experiences, and significant others (most particularly the peer group and the solo performance tutor). Students described a variety of ways in which these sources of influence were believed to shape and inform how they view themselves in terms of ability, confidence and work-rate, and the paper explores the significance of these attributions for those involved in the delivery and management of music programmes in the higher education sector. Attention is drawn in particular to the contrasting experiences of musicians from varying traditions and genres of music, and to the highly significant influence of the peer group upon self-perception as a performer.