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Synthesis of a new series of 1H-imidazol-1-yl substituted 8-phenylxanthines as adenosine receptor ligands

Bansal, Ranju and Kumar, Gulshan and Gandhi, Deepika and Young, Louise C and Harvey, Alan L (2011) Synthesis of a new series of 1H-imidazol-1-yl substituted 8-phenylxanthines as adenosine receptor ligands. Chemistry and Biodiversity, 8 (7). pp. 1290-1300.

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Abstract

A new series of 1H-imidazol-1-yl substituted 8-phenylxanthine analogs has been synthesized to study the effects of the imidazole group on the binding affinity of compounds for adenosine receptors. Competition binding studies of these compounds were carried out in vitro with human cloned receptors using [(3) H]DPCPX and [(3) H]ZM 241385 as radioligands at A(1) and A(2A) adenosine receptors, respectively. The effect of the substitution pattern of the (imidazolyl)alkoxy group on various positions of the phenyl ring at C(8) was also studied. The xanthine derivatives displayed varying degrees of affinity and selectivity towards A(1) and A(2A) receptor subtypes despite a common but variedly substituted Ar-C(8).