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Rapid manufacturing technique used in the development of a regenerative pump impeller

Quail, Francis and Stickland, Matthew and Scanlon, Thomas (2009) Rapid manufacturing technique used in the development of a regenerative pump impeller. In: World congress on engineering 2009. Lecture Notes in Engineering and Computer Science, I & II . International Association of Engineers (IAENG), China, pp. 1730-1736. ISBN 978-988-17012-5-1

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Abstract

This paper presents a method of rapid manufacture used in the development of a regenerative pump impeller. Rapid manufacturing technology was used to create complex impeller blade profiles for testing as part of a regenerative pump optimisation process. Regenerative pumps are the subject of increased interest in industry. Ten modified impeller blade profiles, from the standard radial configuration, were evaluated with the use of computational fluid dynamics and experimental testing. Prototype impellers were needed for experimental validation of the CFD results. The manufacture of the complex blade profiles using conventional milling techniques is a considerable challenge for skilled machinists. The complexity of the modified blade profiles would normally necessitate the use of expensive CNC machining with 5 axis capability. With an impeller less than 75 mm in diameter and a maximum blade thickness of 1.3mm, a rapid manufacturing technique enabled production of complex blade profiles that were dimensionally accurate and structurally robust enough for testing. As more advanced rapid prototyping machines become available in the study in the future, e.g. 3D photopolymer jetting machine, the quality of the parts particularly in terms of surface finish will improve and the amount of post processing operations will reduce. This technique offers the possibility to produce components of increased complexity whilst ensuring quality, strength, performance and speed of manufacture. The ability to manufacture complex blade profiles that are robust enough for testing, in a rapid and cost effective manner is proving essential in the overall design optimisation process for the pump.