Picture of blood cells

Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS) , based within the Faculty of Science.

SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

Explore the Open Access research of SIPBS. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

The use of the chick biventer cervicis preparation to assess the protective activity of six international reference antivenoms on the neuromuscular effects of snake venoms in vitro

Barfaraz, A and Harvey, A L (1994) The use of the chick biventer cervicis preparation to assess the protective activity of six international reference antivenoms on the neuromuscular effects of snake venoms in vitro. Toxicon, 32 (3). pp. 267-272. ISSN 0041-0101

Full text not available in this repository.Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

The protective activity of some antivenoms on the neuromuscular activity in vitro of six snake venoms was established in order to test the feasibility of using a simple isolated nerve-muscle preparation to compare different antivenoms. Six venoms designated as International Reference Venoms by the World Health Organization (WHO) were used: Echis carinatus (Iran), Echis carinatus (Mali), Naja naja kaouthia, Notechis scutatus, Trimeresurus flavoviridis, and Vipera russelli (Thailand). The chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation was used to detect neurotoxic and myotoxic effects. The ratio of the amount of antivenom needed to neutralize a dose of venom (w/w) was calculated in order to quantify the potencies of the antivenoms. The antivenom to venom ratios were 1000 for Echis carinatus (Mali) and for Notechis scutatus; 100 for Naja naja kaouthia and Vipera russelli; and 10 for Echis carinatus (Iran) and Trimeresurus falvoviridis. It is concluded that in vitro assays using the chick biventer cervicis preparation could be used to compare the relative potencies of different antivenoms at neutralizing myotoxic and neurotoxic toxins in snake venoms.