Picture of sea vessel plough through rough maritime conditions

Innovations in marine technology, pioneered through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering based within the Faculty of Engineering.

Research here explores the potential of marine renewables, such as offshore wind, current and wave energy devices to promote the delivery of diverse energy sources. Expertise in offshore hydrodynamics in offshore structures also informs innovations within the oil and gas industries. But as a world-leading centre of marine technology, the Department is recognised as the leading authority in all areas related to maritime safety, such as resilience engineering, collision avoidance and risk-based ship design. Techniques to support sustainability vessel life cycle management is a key research focus.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Development and validation of detailed building, plant and controller modelling to demonstrate interactive behaviour of system components

Cockroft, Jeremy and Kennedy, D. and O'Hara, Martin and Samuel, Aizaz Aamir and Strachan, Paul and Tuohy, Paul Gerard (2009) Development and validation of detailed building, plant and controller modelling to demonstrate interactive behaviour of system components. In: 11th International IBPSA Conference, 2009-07-27 - 2009-07-30.

[img] PDF
Tuohy_PG_Pure_Development_and_validation_of_detailed_building_plant_and_controller_modelling_to_demonstrate_interactive_behaviour_of_system_components.pdf
Preprint

Download (710kB)

Abstract

As plant modelling becomes capable of more complexity and detailed resolution, new opportunities arise for the virtual evaluation of discrete plant components such as flow control and energy conversion devices, and controllers. Such objects are conventionally developed and tested at the prototype stage in a laboratory environment. Designers now seek to use modelling technology to extend their understanding from limited laboratory test results to full building and plant system analysis. This paper describes the development of a modelling system, using ESP-r, for typical United Kingdom domestic house types with hydronic gas or oil fired central heating including radiator and underfloor heating systems, and with a variety of conventional or advanced control types. It demonstrates the ability of detailed building and plant modelling to reveal unexpected insights into how real control systems perform in combination with other plant items and in different building types, including estimation of their influence on annual energy consumption. Comparisons with measurements taken in test rooms confirm that the observed behaviour of controls is realised in practice. The authors conclude that the complex dynamic interactions that take place between the various elements that make up a real building energy system have an important influence on its overall energy performance, revealing causes of variance that cannot be identified by laboratory testing alone, or by simplistic energy assessment tools.