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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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A quantitative study of eye and head movements during smooth pursuit in patients with cerebellar disease

Waterston, J A and Barnes, G R and Grealy, M A (1992) A quantitative study of eye and head movements during smooth pursuit in patients with cerebellar disease. Brain, 115 (5). pp. 1343-1358. ISSN 0006-8950

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Abstract

Eye and head movements were analysed during smooth pursuit in 16 patients with various forms of cerebellar disease. Smooth pursuit gain was reduced across all frequencies and velocities of target motion for the patient group as a whole, during both sinusoidal and pseudo-random target motion. The graded breakdown in the pursuit response, as pseudo-random target motion became less predictable, was of a similar magnitude in patients and controls, implying that the predictive pursuit mechanisms were intact in these patients. During head-free pursuit, when vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) suppression was necessary, performance was not significantly different from that observed during head-fixed pursuit in the patient group. This finding is similar to that noted in control subjects, and is consistent with the observation that the VOR gains associated with head movements in darkness were similar in the patient and control groups. The deficits in pursuit and VOR suppression in patients with cerebellar disease therefore represent a decrease in gain in the closed-loop visual feedback pathways with apparent sparing of the predictive pathways.