Picture of UK Houses of Parliament

Leading national thinking on politics, government & public policy through Open Access research

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Government & Public Policy, based within the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Research here is 1st in Scotland for research intensity and spans a wide range of domains. The Department of Politics demonstrates expertise in understanding parties, elections and public opinion, with additional emphases on political economy, institutions and international relations. This international angle is reflected in the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC) which conducts comparative research on public policy. Meanwhile, the Centre for Energy Policy provides independent expertise on energy, working across multidisciplinary groups to shape policy for a low carbon economy.

Explore the Open Access research of the School of Government & Public Policy. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Factors that impact on participation in physical education

Forsyth, Stuart and Lowry, Ruth and Mutrie, Nanette and Deuchar, Ross (2009) Factors that impact on participation in physical education. In: Fourth Physical Education, Physical Activity and Youth Sport Forum PE PAYS, 2009-06-01.

[img]
Preview
PDF (PEPAYS_Proceedings_2009.pdf)
PEPAYS_Proceedings_2009.pdf

Download (717kB)| Preview

    Abstract

    Physical education uses or employs what modern society recognises as sport and other similar activities to deliver curricular content that requires students to be physically active. However, not all students are committed to participate. Disengaging, they sit away from the activity, forgetting their kit or producing a note for the teacher requesting no activity. The issue of non participation in physical education was formally recognised at national government level in Scotland (Scottish Executive,2004) where the Ministerial Review Group recommended that schools be supported in improving the quality of student experience in physical education so that current levels of participation would be increased. This study in one Scottish high school formed the first part of a wider schedule of research aimed at understanding and creating autonomy supportive environments in physical education and as such had a clear strategic purpose to quantify students' levels of self-determination in relation to their participation in physical education.