Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

The enhancement and recovery of footwear marks contaminated in soil : a feasibility study

Croft, Shiona and NicDaeid, N. and Savage, Kathleen and Vallance, Richard and Ramage, Ruth, Scottish Police Services Authority Forensic Services, Glasgow, UK (2011) The enhancement and recovery of footwear marks contaminated in soil : a feasibility study. Journal of Forensic Identification. ISSN 0895-173X

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Little published research has been conducted on the chemical enhancement of soil contaminated footwear marks. Investigations into the application, including the advantages and limitations of processes available for the enhancement of footwear marks in soil were carried out as part of this study. This included a comparison of current enhancement solutions such as potassium thiocyanate, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, potassium ferrocyanide and bromophenol blue. The solutions were compared on the basis of sensitivity, sharpness of the colour reaction and their application to a range of commonly encountered substrates. The best preforming chemical enhancement technique for footwear impressions in soil was found to be potassium thiocyanate. Potassium thiocyanate was further explored to study the effects of aging the mark deposited as well as assessing the stability (shelf life) of the solution. It was found that the age of the mark appeared to have no significant effect on its ability to be chemically enhanced using potassium thiocyanate. The stability study of potassium thiocyanate revealed that whilst aged solutions still enhanced footwear marks, background staining, fading and deterioration in colour sharpness were all observed.