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The effect of business or enterprise training on opportunity recognition and entrepreneurial skills of graduates and non-graduates in the UK

Levie, J.D. and Hart, M. and Anyadyke-Danes, M. (2010) The effect of business or enterprise training on opportunity recognition and entrepreneurial skills of graduates and non-graduates in the UK. Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research. pp. 749-759.

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Abstract

This paper attempts to overcome methodological challenges in demonstrating the effect of enterprise training on opportunity perception and entrepreneurial skills perception of trainees. A large scale sample of individuals in the UK, part of the 2007 GEMUK database, is utilised. Logistic regression shows that controlling for demographic effects, experience and attitudes, different types of training had different effects on opportunity perception and entrepreneurial skills perception. The results suggest that a combination of college-based training and work placements may provide a better all-round entrepreneurial capability for both graduates and non-graduates.