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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Deprotonative metalation using ate compounds: synergy, synthesis, and structure building

Mulvey, R.E. and Mongin, F. and Uchiyama, M. and Kondo, Y. (2007) Deprotonative metalation using ate compounds: synergy, synthesis, and structure building. Angewandte Chemie, 46 (21). pp. 3802-3824. ISSN 0044-8249

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Abstract

Historically, single-metal organometallic species such as organolithium compounds have been the reagents ofch oice in synthetic organic chemistry for performing deprotonation reactions. Over the past few years, a complementary new class of metalating agents has started to emerge. Owing to a variable central metal (magnesium, zinc, or aluminum), variable ligands (both in their nature and number), and a variable second metallic center (an alkali metal such as lithium or sodium), 'ate' complexes are highly versatile bases that exhibit a synergic chemistry which cannot be replicated by the homometallic magnesium, zinc, or aluminum compounds on their own. Deprotonation accomplished by using these organometallic ate complexes has opened up new perspectives in organic chemistry with unprecedented reactivities and sometimes unusual and unpredictable regioselectivities.