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Open Access research that is better understanding work in the global economy...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation based within Strathclyde Business School.

Better understanding the nature of work and labour within the globalised political economy is a focus of the 'Work, Labour & Globalisation Research Group'. This involves researching the effects of new forms of labour, its transnational character and the gendered aspects of contemporary migration. A Scottish perspective is provided by the Scottish Centre for Employment Research (SCER). But the research specialisms of the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation go beyond this to also include front-line service work, leadership, the implications of new technologies at work, regulation of employment relations and workplace innovation.

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Transferable skills - Can higher education deliver?

Kemp, I. and Seagraves, Liz (1995) Transferable skills - Can higher education deliver? Studies in Higher Education, 20 (3). pp. 315-328. ISSN 0307-5079

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Abstract

Personal Transferable Skills have been placed on the higher education agenda, both by the recognition that there is the need for a flexible, adaptable workforce as we move into the twenty-first century, and by the requirements of both employers and students that graduates can make an immediate contribution to any job situation. This article reports on the findings of a survey carried out in one institution to review course provision for, lecturers' approaches to, and students" perceptions of the development and assessment of certain communication skills. A number of issues arise from the findings and these are discussed. The article concludes that, despite innovative initiatives, some radical rethinking is required if transferable skills are to be addressed seriously in higher education.