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Geographical co-location, social networks and inter-firm marketing co-operation : the case of the salmon industry

Felzensztein, C. and Gimmon, E. and Carter, S.L. (2010) Geographical co-location, social networks and inter-firm marketing co-operation : the case of the salmon industry. Long Range Planning, 43 (5-6). 675–690. ISSN 0024-6301

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Abstract

This study looks at the factors that influence the development of marketing co-operation among cluster-based firms. It examines data from SMEs operating within the salmon farming industry in two different regions: Scotland and Chile. Analyses indicate that informal social networks help explain the observed relationship between geographical proximity and inter-firm marketing co-operation, especially for firms located in peripheral rural communities. A theoretical model is proposed for further research in the field that, until recently, has been traditionally analysed only by economists. Practical implications are suggested for practitioners and policymakers