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Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS) , based within the Faculty of Science.

SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

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Research into collaborative, pluralistically-oriented therapy processes: A practitioner-friendly narrative review

Cooper, Mick (2008) Research into collaborative, pluralistically-oriented therapy processes: A practitioner-friendly narrative review. In: 39th SPR International Meeting, 2008-06-18 - 2008-06-21. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

The collaborative pluralistic framework for counselling and psychotherapy suggests that effective therapy is organised around active client-therapist negotiation around goals, tasks and methods, and that specific metacommunicative attention to these domains within therapy discourse will maximise client engagement in therapy process, and client use of personal and cultural resources. This paper introduces the pluralistic framework, and presents a review and analysis of research that has addressed these themes. Specifically, the paper reviews the literature on the relationship between client outcomes and preferences, predilections, negotiation around the goals of therapy, aptitude-treatment interactions and tailor-made vs. standardised therapies. The implications of these findings for the further development of research and practice around a collaborative pluralistic approach are discussed.