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Electronic commerce in the on-line and electronic publishing industry: a business model for web publishing

Henderson, K.; Smith, J., ed. (1999) Electronic commerce in the on-line and electronic publishing industry: a business model for web publishing. In: Redefining the information chain: new ways and voices, 1999-05-10 - 1999-05-12.

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Abstract

The paper commences with a brief definition of electronic commerce. The relationship between electronic commerce and electronic and on-line publishing is discussed. Current models of internet commerce are presented in order to form a basis for an appropriate business model. This paper defines the traditional information chain in the print publishing context and attempts to define changes in the information chain arising from application of electronic commerce in the electronic and on-line publishing industries. The paper commences with a brief definition of electronic commerce. The relationship between electronic commerce and electronic and on-line publishing is discussed. Current models of internet commerce are presented in order to form a basis for an appropriate business model. This paper defines the traditional information chain in the print publishing context and attempts to define changes in the information chain arising from application of electronic commerce in the electronic and on-line publishing industries. There is a slight bias toward the academic environment as this is the area most familiar to the author.