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Literary linguistics: Open Access research in English language

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by English Studies at Strathclyde. Particular research specialisms include literary linguistics, the study of literary texts using techniques drawn from linguistics and cognitive science.

The team also demonstrates research expertise in Renaissance studies, researching Renaissance literature, the history of ideas and language and cultural history. English hosts the Centre for Literature, Culture & Place which explores literature and its relationships with geography, space, landscape, travel, architecture, and the environment.

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There's NO stopping NsrR, a global regulator of the bacterial NO stress response

Tucker, N.P. and Le Brun, N.E. and Dixon, R. and Hutchings, M.I. (2009) There's NO stopping NsrR, a global regulator of the bacterial NO stress response. Trends in Microbiology, 18 (4). pp. 149-159. ISSN 0966-842X

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Abstract

Nitric oxide (NO) is a toxic, free radical gas with diverse biological roles in eukaryotes and bacteria, being involved in signalling, vasodilation, blood clotting and immunity and as an intermediate in microbial denitrification. Several bacterial transcriptional regulators sense this molecule and regulate the expression of genes involved in both NO detoxification and NO damage repair. However, a recently discovered NO sensing repressor, named NsrR, has gained attention because of its suggested role as a global regulator of the bacterial NO stress response. Recent advances in biochemical and transcriptomic studies of NsrR make it timely to review the current evidence for NsrR as a global regulator and to speculate on the recent controversy over its NO sensing mechanism.