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Salience and temporal sequencing of time related actions in boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Houghton, Stephen and Cordin, Robin and Durkin, K. and Whiting, Ken (2008) Salience and temporal sequencing of time related actions in boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Child Neuropsychology, 14 (1). pp. 60-70. ISSN 0929-7049

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Abstract

Twenty-four 8- to 12-year-old boys with ADHD and 24 non-ADHD boys matched on age and IQ viewed an edited, nondialogue portion of a humorous television program to examine performance on a task requiring attention to and recall of temporal information. Participants were required to retell the story as closely as possible, to complete a picture-prompted sequencing task taken from the story, and to identify time-saving actions taken by the central character. Measures were also obtained of the number of prospective, retrospective, or present time-related references made and whether participants correctly identified the overarching time theme of the story. Significant group differences in favor of the comparison boys were evident in the total number of actions recalled and the number of events recalled in sequence. When controlling for poorer memory performance in boys with ADHD, however, there was no significant main effect of diagnostic group. A logistic regression analysis controlled for poorer memory performance indicated no significant differences between the number of boys with and without ADHD who correctly identified the overarching time theme of the story.