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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Repeatability of a new observational gait score for unilateral lower limb amputees

Hillman, Susan J and Donald, Stephen C and Herman, Janet and McCurrach, Elaine and McGarry, Anthony and Richardson, Alison M and Robb, James E (2010) Repeatability of a new observational gait score for unilateral lower limb amputees. Gait and Posture, 32 (1). pp. 39-45. ISSN 0966-6362

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of an observational gait analysis score that was developed specifically for unilateral amputees. Ten videotaped sequences were analysed by six experienced observers on two separate occasions. Data were analysed using percentage agreement, the kappa statistic and the coefficient of repeatability. The score demonstrated good intraobserver repeatability with an average repeatability coefficient of 3 (range 1.5-4.6). Interobserver repeatability was poor with a repeatability coefficient of 5.9. This score could be used in practice to assess amputees and is most repeatable if used by the same observer to evaluate changes in patients over time.