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A high power ultrasonic array based test cell

Gachagan, A. and McNab, A. and Blindt, R. and Patrick, M. and Marriott, C. (2004) A high power ultrasonic array based test cell. Ultrasonics, 42 (1-9). pp. 57-68. ISSN 0041-624X

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Abstract

This paper describes the use of finite element (FE) analysis as a tool in the design process for laboratory based ultrasonic test cells. The system was designed to incorporate an array of ultrasonic transducers to provide a pressure focus in the centre of the cell and importantly, operate both above and below the cavitation threshold of the load medium. Furthermore, the cell incorporates a coolant jacket to accommodate temperature control of the load material associated with the process. A 2D FE model corresponding to a slice through the operational plane of the cell was developed and used to investigate the influence of cell wall material and thickness, transducer configuration, rotation of a metallic stirrer blade and heat transfer fluid on the cell acoustic response. Importantly, experimentally measured pressure field maps demonstrate good correlation with the FE predicted fields. A final manufactured test cell is shown to produce a highly focussed region of cavitation. Finally, the importance in accurately representing the acoustic properties of the constituent materials used in such FE models is demonstrated through an illustrated example.