Picture of blood cells

Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS) , based within the Faculty of Science.

SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

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How methods and levels of policing affect road casualty rates

Transport for London (Funder) (2005) How methods and levels of policing affect road casualty rates. [Report]

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Abstract

Traffic laws attempt to improve driving standards by defining as illegal those types of behaviour which are held to be unduly risky, such as drink-driving or driving too fast. These laws are only effective if they are obeyed, but drivers frequently violate traffic laws without being caught. The likelihood of an offender being caught depends on the level of enforcement of these laws by human policing and increasingly by automatic equipment such as speed cameras. This report presents the results of a review of the relevant technical literature that was undertaken by TRL on behalf of Transport for London (TfL) to investigate 'How Methods and Levels of Policing Affect Road Casualty Rates'. The main aims of the review were: (a) to evaluate the findings from existing literature in order to determine whether increasing the level of traffic policing is likely to reduce the number of casualties in road accidents and (b) to summarise the main pieces of work and draw conclusions, including any quantitative relationships between the level of enforcement and the numbers of accidents and casualties. Overall, the literature showed that increased enforcement can lead to significant improvements in road safety. However, determining the precise relationships between levels of policing and casualty rates is problematic on the basis of the available literature. Detailed results are presented along with a brief proposal for a future research project to investigate the influence of levels of traffic policing on accidents and casualty rates.