Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Promoting drivers' compliance with speed limits : testing an intervention based on the theory of planned behaviour

Elliott, M.A. and Armitage, C.J. (2009) Promoting drivers' compliance with speed limits : testing an intervention based on the theory of planned behaviour. British Journal of Psychology, 100 (1). pp. 111-132. ISSN 0007-1269

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

The efficacy of a theory of planned behaviour (TPB)-based intervention to promote drivers' compliance with speed limits was tested. Participants (N = 300) were randomly assigned to an experimental condition, and received persuasive messages designed to change beliefs as specified in the TPB, or a control condition. Baseline and follow-up (1 month post-baseline) measures of TPB variables and behaviour were collected using postal questionnaires. Results showed that the intervention had a significant effect on one control belief, and significantly increased perceived behavioural control and reported behaviour. Mediation analyses confirmed that the control belief change generated the perceived behavioural control change and that the perceived behavioural control change generated the behaviour change. Implications for promoting road safety are discussed.