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Synthesis and characterization of water-soluble densely branched glycopolymers

Besenius, P. and Slavin, S. and Vilela, F. and Sherrington, D.C. (2008) Synthesis and characterization of water-soluble densely branched glycopolymers. Reactive and Functional Polymers, 68 (11). pp. 1524-1533. ISSN 1381-5148

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Abstract

In a one-pot synthesis, highly branched synthetic glycopolymers have been prepared using the 'Strathclyde Methodology' involving a protected galactose monomethacrylate, a branching comonomer (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate or divinylbenzene) and a chain transfer agent (dodecanethiol) with 2,2′-azo-bis-isobutyronitrile as the source of radicals. Branching was confirmed via MALS/SEC and 1H NMR spectroscopy. One attractive feature of the methodology employed is that in a single-step procedure highly branched polymers with molar masses over a range of two orders of magnitude were obtained by fine-tuning the composition of comonomer and chain transfer agent mole feed ratio. Deprotection of the isopropylidene galactose functionalities on the polymers was achieved, leading to water-soluble and potentially bio-compatible synthetic glycopolymers with branched main chain architecture.