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A new tetrahydrofuran derivative from the endophytic fungus chaetomium sp isolated from otanthus maritimus

Aly, A.H. and Debbab, A. and Edrada-Ebel, R.A. and Wray, V. and Muller, W.E.G. and Lin, W.H. and Ebel, R. and Proksch, P., BMBF (Funder), MOST (Funder) (2009) A new tetrahydrofuran derivative from the endophytic fungus chaetomium sp isolated from otanthus maritimus. Zeitschrift fur Naturforschung C, 64 (5-6). pp. 350-354. ISSN 0939-5075

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Abstract

A hitherto unidentified endophytic strain of the genus Chaetomium, isolated from the medicinal plant Otanthus maritimus, yielded a new tetrahydrofuran derivative, aureonitolic acid (1), along with 5 known natural products, 2-6. The structure of 1 was determined by extensive spectroscopic analysis and comparison with reported data. Extracts of the fungus, grown either in liquid culture or on solid rice media, exhibited considerable cytotoxic activity when tested in vitro against L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells. Compounds 2 and 6 showed significant growth inhibition against L5178Y cells with EC50, values of 7.0 and 2.7 mu g/mL, respectively, whereas 1 was inactive.