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Anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities of hygrophila spinosa t. anders leaves (acanthaceae)

Patra, A. and Jha, S. and Murthy, P.N. and Vaibhav, A.D. and Chattopadhyay, P. and Panigrahi, G. and Roy, D. (2009) Anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities of hygrophila spinosa t. anders leaves (acanthaceae). Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research, 8 (2). pp. 133-137. ISSN 1596-5996

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Abstract

Purpose: Hygrophila spinosa T. Anders (Acanthaceae) is commonly used in the traditional system of medicine for the treatment of inflammation, pain, jaundice, rheumatism, arthritis, anaemia, etc. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities of the petroleum ether, chloroform, alcoholic and aqueous extracts of the leaf of this plant. Methods: The anti-inflammatory activity of the various extracts was studied based on their effects on carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats while antipyretic activity was evaluated on the basis of their effect on Brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia in rats. The extracts were screened for alkaloids, steroids, proteins, flavonoids, saponins, mucilage, carbohydrates, organic acids, fats and oils. Results: Preliminary phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloids, steroids, proteins, flavonoids, fats and oils, tannins, mucilage and organic acids in the leaves of H. spinosa. Chloroform and alcoholic extracts of leaves of H. spinosa produced significant (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01) anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, petroleum ether and aqueous extracts did not show significant anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities. The maximum anti-inflammatory activities produced by chloroform and alcoholic extracts (400 mg/kg) were 33.7% and 47.5%, respectively. These two extracts also reduced elevated body temperature in rats at 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight doses throughout the observation period of 6 h. Conclusion: Chloroform and alcoholic extracts of H. spinosa leaves have anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities.