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Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS) , based within the Faculty of Science.

SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

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Molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction of cephalexin from water-based matrices

Beltran, A. and Fontanals, N. and Marce, R.M. and Cormack, P.A.G. and Borrull, F. (2009) Molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction of cephalexin from water-based matrices. Journal of Separation Science, 32 (19). pp. 3319-3326. ISSN 1615-9306

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Abstract

In the present paper, we describe the synthesis of a cephalexin (CFX) molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), the direct application of the MIP to SPE for the determination of CFX (which is a -lactam antibiotic) in human urine and the use of the MIP in a tandem SPE system to determine CFX in river water. The molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) showed cross-selectivity for amoxicillin (AMX; also a -lactam antibiotic). This allowed both CFX and AMX to be quantified in acidified human urine, with recoveries of 78 and 60% for CFX and AMX, respectively, when the urine samples were spiked with CFX and AMX at 4 mg/L. These analyses were facile because the molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) extracts were clear compared to the nonpurified samples. In order to increase the sample volume for river water analyses, a tandem SPE system incorporating a commercially available sorbent was implemented. With this set-up, CFX was determined with recoveries in excess of 50% when 200 mL of acidified river water samples spiked at 10 g/L with CFX were percolated through the tandem system.